Tony Simone

New York State Assembly

Tony will be a voice for equality in New York!

Biography

Tony is a native New Yorker, son of a Peruvian mother who immigrated to the United States and a father who drove taxis and trucks to support his family. His late grandfather Tony, a Teamster’s union delegate, showed him the importance of public service and collective action from a young age.

Today, Tony lives in Hell’s Kitchen with his fiancé Jason, and their rescue dog, Radar. As a community leader and organizer in both the public and private sectors, he has led fights for tenant and immigrant rights, marriage equality, and accessible green space. Tony knows that change begins with listening to community concerns, building diverse coalitions, and implementing innovative solutions to our most pressing problems.

Tony began his career in the private sector, but quickly his belief in the power of our communities drove him to public service. He worked for some of our state’s greatest elected officials—Hillary Clinton, State Comptroller Carl McCall, and State Senator Catherine Abate—and had the honor to serve as Director of Community Outreach for the NYC Council under Council Speaker Christine Quinn. And he earned a Masters in Public Administration from Columbia University along the way.

In these roles, he directed volunteer relief efforts after Superstorm Sandy, led local initiatives to reduce hate crimes, participated in the NYS marriage equality victory, and defended tenants from bad landlords. These were all humbling experiences. He saw that those who most needed help often had the least access to the resources of government.

If elected, Tony will continue the legacy of the current Assembly Member, Dick Gottfried, focusing on the issues that matter most to working class New Yorkers. That includes passing the New York Health Act to create universal single-payer coverage so we can all have better health care at lower cost, fighting for more truly affordable housing, and helping families and small businesses not only recover, but thrive as we come out of this health and economic crisis.

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