Angie Craig Defeats Homophobic Congressional Incumbent; Becomes First LGBTQ Member of Congress from Minnesota

Washington, DC – Openly LGBTQ candidate Angie Craig defeated incumbent U.S. Representative Jason Lewis tonight – one of the most sexist and anti-LGBTQ members of the U.S. Congress and a key pickup seat for Democrats. Craig also made history, becoming the first openly LGBTQ person elected to the U.S. Congress from Minnesota and the first openly LGBTQ mother in Congress. Democrats considered the MN-2 seat to be critical to building a strong majority in the U.S. House. Victory Fund made Craig one of its “Game Changer” candidates, directly contributed $9000, and raised more than $39,000 for her campaign.

“Angie’s victory is a historic moment that redefines what is possible for an LGBTQ person in Minnesota, and it is made even sweeter given she defeated one of the most homophobic and transphobic incumbents in the U.S. Congress to pull it off,” said Mayor Annise Parker, President & CEO of LGBTQ Victory Fund. “Tonight Minnesota voters chose an authentic, solutions-oriented business leader to replace a divisive anti-LGBTQ demagogue – sending a powerful message to all incumbent legislators who attack LGBTQ people and other communities in hopes of political gain. Angie will bring a unique and important perspective as the only openly LGBTQ mother in Congress, and her presence will humanize our lives and families for her Congressional colleagues.”

Thirteen LGBTQ women received a major party nomination for a Congressional seat this year, more than at any other time in U.S. history.

Live Election Night Results: Victory Fund is live-tracking the election results for 225 of its openly LGBTQ endorsed candidates. The latest updates can be found at victoryfund.org/results2018.

Rainbow Wave by the Numbers: LGBTQ Victory Fund released several reports on the unprecedented Rainbow Wave of openly LGBTQ candidates who ran for office during the 2018 election cycle, including one reporting on the total number of candidates who ran, another looking at the total number of candidates by state, and one analyzing Congressional and gubernatorial nominees.